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The 70,273 Project - Janet Plotkin

70273

Blocks for this project were collected at the February, March, and April 2018 Guild meetings. These blocks will be sewn into small quilts and forwarded to the organizers of The 70,273 Project.

"The 70273 Project" is a sewing project to raise awareness of the disabled people killed before the holocaust. Each participant will make one white block with two red X's on it. This was how disabled people were marked for death.


Each block should contain the image of 2 red "X"s on a white, or white-on-white background, with a margin of ¼ to ½ inch so the red X is not lost when the blocks are sewn together; no other images or designs should appear. These can be pieced or appliquéd. You can read more about the project at www.The70273Project.org. Show a little love for the many souls lost during this abominable time and make one or more blocks. The three sizes of blocks requested are

These sizes include the ¼ to ½ inch of white surround and the ¼ inch seam allowance, i.e. these are the unfinished sizes. Because reds can be so unpredictable, please pre-wash your red fabric (shocking words from this anti-pre-washer), and check it for bleeding and crocking.

When your block is done, fill out a Provenance Form and attach your blocks to it. A Provenance form must accompany each submission.

We will accept blocks at the April Guild meeting. All the blocks will be assembled into a top, quilted, and bound, and the completed quilt forwarded to The 70273 Project from the Quilters Guild of Plano. If more than one top can be made we will be thrilled and send a second, or third, completed quilt to the Project. Show a little love for the many souls lost during this abominable time and make one or more blocks.

You can read more about the project at the following links:


Seeing Spots Challenge (Polka Dot) - Janet Plotkin

polka dots

This guild challenge involves POLKA DOTS! Don't forget to bring a one yard piece of polka dot fabric to the March meeting for the one-yard rip off, and a pair of small scissors or snips to rip with. Those going for the glory will turn their polka dot bounty into a challenge project due in April. There may be prizes.

If you have any questions contact Janet Plotkin.



Mug Rug Challenge - Donna Petrick


Thank you to all of you who participated in the latest activity--Mug Rug Challenge/Exchange. There were some really cute ones done. I hope you enjoyed being involved in this activity. While I saw this done at the Irving guild, I understand that Janet Plotkin (our new VP of Activities) may be the one who started it in this area. Thank you, Janet. And I know all of you are looking forward to move activities to come and Janet will do a wonderful job, keeping us busy with fun projects.


Do-It-Yourself Round Robin Challenge - Linda Neal

The new guild activity for 2015, from our Activities Chairperson Linda Neal, is a Do-It-Yourself Round Robin. To start, you will need to find or make your center block. This is a great time to use a UFO block, or make a new block. Starting in January, you will add a border every other month, for a total of six borders. Each border will use a different technique. Linda will present each border style at the guild meeting and show examples. This guild activity is meant to be fun and to encourage creativity. Get the details and lots of tips for success by downloading the Round Robin Info Sheet.

Linda and MJ showed us some examples of Round Robin quilts at the November meeting:

Click on a link below to go to details of a specific border:

Border #1 - Traditional Pieced Border
Border #2 - Embroidered Border
Border #3 - Paper Pieced Border
Border #4 - Applique Border
Border #5 - Embellished Border
Border #6 - Wrap It Up Border

If you have questions that are not covered in the Round Robin Info Sheet, email Linda Neal


Border #1 - Traditional Pieced Border

The first border you are to add is a traditional pieced border, pieced by hand or by machine. You choose the pattern, the width, and the colors. Linda made three poster boards of possible pieced borders that you might choose:

There are lots of other possibilities to choose from: border books, Pinterest, patterns you may have at home. If you search the internet for ideas, search under "medallion quilts."

Consider using floating or coping strips to join your block to your first border. (See examples on the poster boards.) The strip can be used to separate the block from the border, or you may need it to make the border fit your block.

You have two months to make your first border. The January presentation of the pieced border will be repeated at the February meeting. In March, Linda will announce the next border to add to your quilt - it will be completely different from a pieced border! Consider bringing your project to guild to inspire others as you complete your borders. Have fun working on your first border.


Border#2 - Embroidered Border

The second border to be added is an embroidered border. This can be done in several different ways:


Border #3 - Paper Pieced Border

Border #3 is a paper pieced or foundation pieced border - any technique that involves basting/sewing your fabric to paper to make your border. Remember, you can make the whole border paper pieced or just parts of it.


Border #4 - Applique Border

Border #4 is applique. You can do hand applique, machine applique, or if you have an embroidery machine you can do machine embroidery applique.

Another type of applique is broderie perse. This is a technique that has been around since the 1800's. It can be done with a fusible web or needle turn. Find a motif on some fabric that coordinates with your quilt. Apply fusible to the back. Fussy cut the motif. Iron it on to plain fabric. Then use your machine to zig zag or blanket stitch the raw edge,like machine applique.

As always: You can do as much or as little applique as you desire. Either just the 4 corners or do the entire side. Have fun!


Border #5 - Embellished Border

Border #5 is embellishment. You may choose ANY border style and then add embellishment. Depending on the type of embellishment you choose, the embellishment may be added now or after quilting. Any amount or type of embellishment will fulfill the border #5 challenge. Embellishment means to add a decorative item to a quilt top. I have listed several types of embellishments, but you can add ANYTHING that works for your project.

And remember the Houston Quilt Show is coming up. They will have LOTS of fun embellishments. Have fun with border #5!



Border #6 - Wrap It Up Border

Picture #1

We made it to border #6! This border is called "Wrap It Up." You may add whatever type of border that is needed to complete your quilt. You may want to repeat an element or technique you have used previously. Or maybe you want to just add a focus fabric to pull your quilt together. You can just sew on a focus fabric for a border, or maybe you would like to put your fabric on by appliqueing scallops. See Picture #1. Remember: this is your last border so have fun with it!


The last "challenge" I have for you is the edge treatment. I challenge you to try something you have not done before. This can be done to the edge of the quilt before quilting or by adding a fancy binding as described below. Examples of a quilt edge treatment include: Rounded corners, Scalloped, or free form edges. (See Picture #2).

Picture #2

Picture #3


Or how about trying a different type of binding. (See Picture #3). Examples include:


I hope you have enjoyed this years Do-It-Yourself Round Robin Challenge. It has been fun watching everyone's progress. Please bring your project to the guild meeting to show off your work!